Doctor Who Cares

The first episode of the new series of Doctor Who is quite impressive as is actually really good. I can’t say I was entirely happy with it though. Title sequence is excellent, new title music is spot on and I just love the way that they’ve kept certain classic elements. Christopher Eccleston is a very engaging Doctor and even Billie Piper is not as annoying as I expected her to be. The newly scored main theme is abysmal though. It gets a higher rating from me than it would otherwise mostly because I enjoy modern jive and especially the type of dancing that this episode popularised. It really is a great love story that shows how even though someone dies, love for a person never dies. Emilio Estevez carrys his role off very well as a Jock – it gets a little cringe worthy when he’s high at the end – and rushing around like a loony. But the end with Ally Sheedy certainly makes up for it.

Today’s kitchen experience

The box of Tetley’s Tea bags in the work kitchen has the following message on it: “A cup of Tetley’s tea has less caffeine then a cup of ground or instant coffee, and that’s a fact!”. It’s a fact apparently. It’s as if they know that people will expect companies to lie to them, so they wanted to make it clear that this is probably actually true this time. Basically, anything without a “and that’s a fact” suffix is definitely a lie. Everything else just probably is.

Also, Green Tea can help prevent cancer, but it gives me bad breath (well, worse breath). So, I’ll live forever, but I’ll be alone.

BAM!

I’ve noticed something about mothers. They seem morbidly obsessed with sudden and sad deaths. Not a week goes by without me hearing of somebody’s mother telling stories of shockingly sudden bouts of cancer or heart attacks. They don’t seem to notice the hundreds of people around them who, every single day, don’t get cancer and don’t have heart attacks.

“Paul Brown. Sure you remember little Paulie Brown, you used to play together as kids. He’s married now; a wife to support. Three young children of his own too. Twenty six years old he is. Twenty six. Last week, he was walking across the road to the supermarket, and BAM! breathing normally. how sudden! how fine and dandy!”

Postal experiments

Some US researchers did a series of postal experiments and published the results online. They mailed various packages via the US postal service to see if they were received and how long they took to arrive. They purposefully didn’t wrap items and chose very heavy, strangely shaped, suspicious, seemingly sentimental and even disgusting items. The results are interesting and hilarious.

In once case they wrapped and posted a brick. It arrived as a “plastic bag containing broken and pulverized remnants of brick. Inside was a small piece of paper with a number code on it.”. They also posted a small bottle of spring water, which they observed the postman open and drink during his round.

suited and booted

Generally speaking, in my own experience, I find people dress smartly only when they aren’t as good as they need to be. This seems to doubly apply in the field of IT.

That isn’t to say scruffy people are immediately capable.

(Upon normalising the above, you get: “humans aren’t generally as good as they need to be”.)